How many hopes lie buried here...

Published by: SCNHC     Categories: The Strange Series

A headless statue in a small historic town might turn a few heads at Halloween (no pun intended). But a somber, heart-strings pulling story is found here. It is the grave marker of Victor M. Lunney, who died at just four years old in 1894. He was ailing from the flu epidemic, but in a terrible twist of fate he died instead from receiving the wrong type of medicine.

His mother was said to never speak of his passing, and silently visited his grave every Friday at 1pm and stayed for exactly an hour. The entire cemetery has suffered significant damage from the elements over the years, hence the condition of Victor's grave marker which reads:

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The Strange Series: The Conestoga Wagon in Wagener

Published by: SCNHC     Categories: The Strange Series

The small agricultural community of Wagener is worth the trip just for the views. Driving past farmland and picturesque fields, the town has rural southern charm for sure. But what caught our eye was the huge wagon situated near the town entrance. What's the story here?

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The Strange Series: What you don't know about the Charleston Jail

Published by: SCNHC     Categories: The Strange SeriesAfrican American History

Notoriously haunted, we decided to scrounge up a few unknown TRUE things about the Charleston Jail that just might surprise you!

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The Strange Series: The Mathews Cemetery

Published by: SCNHC     Categories: The Strange Series

This one is still a mystery. You can spot the Mathews Cemetery in between Edgefield and Greenwood on Highway 25. The route is mainly wooded, but if you look close enough you may spot a mysterious bricked entryway. 

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The Reed Cemetery

Published by: SCNHC     Categories: The Strange Series

The Reed Cemetery in Blackville (my hometown) is pretty much impossible to find. I just happened to have an "in" with the location since many of my ancestors are buried there. (Disclaimer: this site is not accessible to the public, but I think the story is worth telling anyway).

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